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Why choose Gifts for Good this Christmas

Giving a charitable gift at Christmas is a wonderful thing to do but the choice can be overwhelming! It can help to understand how it all works so here’s everything you need to know about Gifts for Good, an initiative from ChildFund Australia that offers a simple way to transform the lives of children in disadvantaged communities around the world.

Real gifts that change lives

Gifts for Good are real gifts that are given to children and families to help them on a path to self-sufficiency. They are an essential part of ChildFund’s long-term community development programs, providing the key resources needed to get these programs off the ground. If you buy three chickens, for example, three chickens will be given to a family in need, along with training on animal husbandry, information about the nutritional benefits of eggs for their children and even small-business skills to help them generate an income.

How does it work?

In three easy steps you can give special and affordable gifts designed to make a major impact on children living in poverty. When you select your Gifts for Good, they are delivered to children or families who really need them and you’ll get a beautiful card so you can share your gift with your friends and loved ones.

How are gifts selected?

Each gift in the catalogue has been selected on a needs basis. So when you buy a scholarship for a girl in India, that’s because girls’ education has been identified as a critical need in the communities where ChildFund works.

While gifts relating to education, health care and livelihoods are regularly included in the catalogue, new items this year include postie bikes and motorbike mechanic apprenticeships, due to the increased need for reliable transport and skills for young people in an emerging industry.

How are gifts allocated?

Each gift is allocated to a child or family based on a needs assessment. These assessments are usually conducted in collaboration with the community to decide who is most in need.

ChildFund is committed to supplying the exact gifts purchased to children and families who really need them. If more gifts are donated than a country is able to provide, we reallocate the funds to a similar program.

When ChildFund ambassador Danielle Cormack visited Cambodia, she met children who received solar lamps and reading kits from Australian Gifts for Good donors.

Do the gifts really get there?

Yes! Once your donation is processed, the funds are sent to our country offices overseas to purchase and deliver the gifts you have chosen.

In 2016, here are just some of the gifts we delivered:

  • 2,256 fruit trees to families in Kenya, Sri Lanka, Uganda and the Philippines who now how have a long-term source of nutrition for their children.
  • 905 papaya sprouts and 181 tins of pumpkin seeds to families in Myanmar so they can grow their own fruit and vegetables.
  • 811 chickens to familes Kenya, Indonesia, Timor-Leste, Zambia and Uganda who can now give their children a daily dose of eggs.
  • 741 text books to children in Guatemala so they can keep up in school.
  • 311 solar lamps to children in Cambodia so they can see at night and do not need dangerous indoor fires.

This year we have 24 items in the catalogue that have been requested by communities we work with around the world. Head to the website to check out the range or read our guide to this year’s gifts for inspiration to help you choose gifts for family and friends.

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