Stories: Children, Communities, Futures

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Last time you were here, you were looking to help vulnerable children and families. Your support can save and change lives.

  • First ever charitable partnership for RWC Sevens
  • Collaboration brings new opportunities for participation
  • Partnership supports life skills, gender equity and leadership

Rugby World Cup Sevens 2022 has partnered with ChildFund to help improve the lives of children and young people across Africa.  A first-ever charitable partnership for a Rugby World Cup Sevens, ChildFund and World Rugby have now partnered together on three successive Rugby World Cups, benefitting over 50,000 children around the world in the process.

ChildFund are set to support a festival of sevens rugby in Cape Town this September, having already been appointed Principal Charity Partners of Rugby World Cup 2021 in New Zealand as well as taking on the same role at Rugby World Cup 2019 in Japan.

ChildFund believes in the power of sport to change children’s lives and ChildFund Rugby, its rugby for development initiative, implements a range of innovative and award-winning sport for development curricula, giving children and young people from disadvantaged communities the opportunity to play, learn and lead.  The organisation has also been at the heart of fundraising initiatives including Race to Rugby World Cup 2021, a challenge which sees Ron Rutland and Adam Nunn cycling from Japan to New Zealand ahead of Rugby World Cup 2021.

To celebrate the launch of the partnership, ChildFund have produced a short video showcasing a partnership in South Africa, which is using the Reconnect curriculum to encourage children and young people to both play and coach rugby, whilst also learning key life skills, including how to support gender equity and set goals.

Margaret Sheehan, CEO of ChildFund said “ChildFund is looking forward to using the power of rugby to positively impact the lives of children and young people across Africa. We are proud to partner for a third Rugby World Cup, and with the support of the rugby family in South Africa and beyond, we are excited to build on a growing legacy of more than 50,000 vulnerable children around the world that have had opportunities to play, learn and lead through rugby.”

Alan Gilpin CEO of World Rugby said “ChildFund have shown that they know how to use rugby to change lives and we’re delighted to be partnering with them again for Rugby World Cup Seven 2022 in Cape Town.  Together we will have befitted over 50,000 young people, showing solidarity, integrity and respect, the values that rugby is famous for being put into action.”

For more information, visit www.childfundrugby.org

Globally every 2 minutes, a child dies of malaria. Each year, more than 200 million new cases of the disease are reported.

On 25 April each year, World Malaria Day aims to raise awareness about global efforts to control the spread of malaria and celebrate the improvements that have been made in the areas of treatment, prevention and education. 

A key focus is on remote communities, particularly in developing countries, where malaria has significantly higher mortality rates. So, let’s dive into what World Malaria Day is all about!

What is malaria?

Malaria is a life-threatening disease, transmitted through the female Anopheles mosquito, that has been infected by the plasmodium parasite. When this mosquito bites someone, this parasite is released into the bloodstream of the person. 

Another way malaria can be transmitted is through blood transfusions or organ transplants.

Why is malaria prevention a serious global issue?

In 2020, the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) reported that an estimated 627,000 people died of malaria. An estimated 95% of these deaths were in the WHO African Region. The tragedy is that malaria is both a treatable and curable disease, however it can be fatal when the disease is not detected or treatment has not started early enough.

Access to adequate healthcare is a driving factor in the high malarial mortality rate in tropical and subtropical regions such as Africa, South America and South East Asia. Widespread infection rates, across communities and multiple continents, with many cases still going unreported, is what makes malaria prevention a global issue.

When was World Malaria Day established?

In 2007, World Malaria Day was established at the 60th session of the World Health Assembly. It was proposed that what was once commemorated as Africa Malaria Day should be changed to World Malaria Day. From then on, World Malaria Day has recognised the disease’s global impact, rather than focusing on African communities exclusively.

What is the theme for World Malaria Day 2022?

This year’s theme is “Harness innovation to reduce the malaria disease burden and save lives”, which calls for new diagnostics and medicines to speed up the pace of progress against malaria.

Led by the World Health Organisation, World Malaria Day 2022 is calling on investors and innovators to do their part in creating new vector control approaches and other tools, which will assist in the fight against malaria globally.

How you can make a difference this World Malaria Day

This World Malaria Day, join us in the fight to eradicate suffering caused by this disease in remote and rural areas. You can help a child sleep safe at night by donating the gift of an insecticide-treated mosquito net, as this is the most cost-effective way to prevent children contracting the disease.

Your support can change the life of a child, and help us reach zero cases of malaria globally.